It seems that a lot is going on in DC these days. In what may have been lost in all the other activity, yesterday the Department of Labor issued a Request for Information seeking notice and comment before issuing revised proposed regulations regarding the minimum salary level required to  meet the three most common exemptions

Thank you Fox Rothschild LLP’s Steven Ludwig for forwarding this to me.

Yes, there are other developments going on with the Trump Administration that have nothing to do with Russia, Twitter, and fake news.

Today the Department of Labor withdrew its 2015 and 2016 informal guidance on joint employment and independent contractors.  Why is

The Texas Supreme Court has rejected the theory of defamation by compelled self-publication.  Say what? you ask?  Compelled self-publication occurs most often in the employment context, where a terminated employee is compelled to inform subsequent potential employers why the employee was terminated from the employee’s last job.  As the theory goes, if an employer

I get questions all the time about the enforceability of noncompetes in Texas.  I have to respond in the most-irritating lawyer-like way possible: I say that the enforceability of any particular noncompete all depends on the language of the noncompete and the facts of the case.  That response predictably results in a long period of

Over the weekend the Washington Post reported that France has enacted a new law that allows employees to ignore work emails outside typical working hours.   According to the Washington Post, the purpose behind the new French law is to reduce the impact of the stress of work on people’s personal time.  While the new French

Texas case law is clear.  Employment is at will, terminable at any time by either party, with or without cause, absent an express agreement to the contrary.  Fed. Exp. Corp. v. Dutschmann, 846 S.W.2d 282, 283 (Tex. 1993).  This means that unless there is an agreement limiting an employer’s right to terminate, an employer

I have been writing on this blog about how Dallas County juries have shifted over the years from pro-defense to pro-plaintiff, or at least to a point where most prospective jurors in Dallas County don’t necessarily consider lawsuits a bad thing.  In the era of tort reform, this attitude among prospective jurors in Dallas

Late last month a federal judge in Texas issued a nationwide injunction against implementation of the Obama Administration’s new overtime rules under the Fair Labor Standards Act.  The new rules were supposed to go into effect on December 1, 2016, and would have resulted in substantially more employees becoming eligible for overtime under the FLSA.